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Nearly 1 Million Americans Have Multiple Sclerosis, NMSS Prevalence Study Finds

Nearly 1 Million Americans Have Multiple Sclerosis, NMSS Prevalence Study Finds

An estimated 947,000 people in the U.S. have multiple sclerosis (MS) — more than double the long-accepted figure of 400,000 — according to a newly completed study organized and funded by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS).

“This is definitely not what we expected,”  Nicholas G. LaRocca, vice president of healthcare delivery and policy research at the New York-based NMSS, said in an interview with Multiple Sclerosis News Today.

The nonprofit organization presented its poster, “The Prevalence of Multiple Sclerosis in the United States: A Population-Based Healthcare Database Approach,” at the 7thJoint ECTRIMS-ACTRIMS Meeting in Paris, the world’s largest MS research gathering.

Now under peer review, these findings are considered tentative until that review is complete and the study is published in a scientific journal, possibly next year.

Nicholas LaRocca
Dr. Nicholas G. LaRocca

LaRocca, who’s headed the MS Prevalence Initiative since its 2014 launch, said the dramatic jump seen in prevalence has more to do with methodology than an actual rise in the number of MS cases — though he doesn’t discount that possibility

Original source: Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Read more: Nearly 1 Million Americans Have Multiple Sclerosis, NMSS Prevalence Study Finds

 

Reposted: November 14, 2017

Sanofi Wants To Make A Major Footprint In The Multiple Sclerosis Space

Summary

  • Sanofi pays $40 million upfront to license a pre-clinical multiple sclerosis drug known as PRN2246, with potential milestones reaching $765 million.
  • PRN2246 is unlike any other BTK inhibitor because it crosses the blood brain barrier.
  • The licensing of PRN2246 bolsters the multiple sclerosis franchise which already contains AUBAGIO and LEMTRADA.

It was announced this past week that Sanofi (SNY) had licensed a pre-clinical product from a private biotechnology company located in California by the name of Principia Biopharma. The licensed product known as PRN2246 has been developed by Principia up to and including IND enabling studies. This drug is known as a BTK inhibitor, which has been a popular drug over the last few years. If the name BTK inhibitor sounds familiar, that’s because it is.

Imbruvica (ibrutinib) is a BTK inhibitor, which was developed by Pharmacyclics. Pharmacyclics is now a part of Abbvie (ABBV) because of being bought out. Imbruvica has been approved to treat a host of diseases such as: Mantle cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and chronic graft versus host disease. In my opinion, despite only being a pre-clinical product, Sanofi has the possibility to create this drug into a blockbuster in the future if trial results hold up.

Original source: SeekingAlpha.com

Read more: Sanofi Wants To Make A Major Footprint In The Multiple Slcerosis Space

 

Reposted: October 15, 2017

 

Common Allergy Treatment Restores Protective Neuron Coating in MS, Trial Suggests

Common Allergy Treatment Restores Protective Neuron Coating in MS, Trial Suggests

Scientists have been trying to find a way to restore a protective covering around nerve cells whose loss leads to the neuron damage associated with multiple sclerosis.

A team at the University of California, San Francisco may have found a way to do it. And perhaps surprisingly, the possible solution is an over-the-counter allergy drug.

A Phase 2 clinical trial showed that the antihistamine clemastine fumarate helped people with a chronically damaged optic nerve. The therapy led to faster2 firing of patients’ vision neurons, according to a report in the journal The LancetIt also slightly improved how well the patients could distinguish contrast.

While the effect was modest, researchers said the study proved that rejuvenation of the protective of the protective neuron coating — the protein myelin — can occur in those with even chronic nerve-cell damage. The findings are a starting point for the development of more effective treatments, they said.

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a therapy has been able to reverse deficits caused by MS,” Dr. Ari Green, principal investigator of the trial, said in a press release. “It’s not a cure, but it’s a first step towards restoring brain function to the millions who are affected by this chronic, debilitating disease.”

Original Source:  Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Read more:  Common Allergy Treatment Restores Protective Neuron Coating in MS, Trial Suggests

Why Americans with Multiple Sclerosis Are Traveling to Russia for Treatment

An experimental treatment for MS known as HSCT is available in North America, but it’s more accessible and less expensive in Russia.

multiple sclerosis treatment

Do you have any desire to travel to Russia?

You might if you have multiple sclerosis.

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States and Canada are traveling to Russia for an experimental treatment that’s a potential cure for the disease.

However, there are still a number of risks involved.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is a therapy for MS that has, in many cases, been shown to halt progression of the disease with a single treatment.

Source: Healthline

Read more: Why Americans with Multiple Sclerosis Are Traveling to Russia for Treatment

FIRST DRUG SHOWN TO PROMOTE REMYELINATION

October 11, 2017

We hear about ‘breakthroughs’ frequently in MS, and mostly of course, they are not! On this occasion, despite the drug that researchers were testing being an old drug commonly prescribed for hayfever, they found definite evidence of improved neurological function after taking the drug, and the improvement persisted when the drug was stopped. It seems highly likely, given what the researchers have previously tested, that the drug promoted remyelination, something which no agent has previously been able to do.

The research team at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), led by Prof Jonah Chan tested the drug clemastine (trade name Tavist) which has been licensed by the FDA for 40 years now for use in hayfever and allergies and is now a cheap generic.

 Source: Overcoming Multiple.org

Read more:  Promote Remeylination

High-Fat Diets Can Endanger Young MS Patients

These regimens raised the risk for disease relapse, study found

By Mary Elizabeth Dallas

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A fatty diet may up the risk of relapse in children with multiple sclerosis, according to a new study.

But eating a diet rich in vegetables could cut relapse risk in half, the researchers found.

The findings may provide early evidence that dietary changes could help some patients with MS manage their condition, said the research team led by Dr. Emmanuelle Waubant. She’s a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco.

Original source: HealthDay News

Read moreHigh-Fat Diets Can Endanger Young MS Patients

 

Molecules May Help Explain the Mystery of Progressive MS

October 07, 2017

 

Researchers hope their recent discoveries can lead to treatments and medications for this serious form of multiple sclerosis.

molecule

Multiple sclerosis (MS) can present differently in people. It can range from clinically isolated incidents (CIS) and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) to a more disabling, progressive form of MS.

People who originally receive a diagnosis of RRMS may transition into progressive MS, taking 10 to 15 years to do so.

Many people don’t progress at all.

Little is known about what drives the development of progressive MS, but inflammatory factors may contribute to this path.

A recent study has discovered two closely related molecules that may explain why some people develop progressive MS.

Source: Healthline News

Read more: Molecules May Help Explain The Mystery Of Progressive MS 1

Multiple Sclerosis Significantly Associated With Vitamin D Deficiency

October 06, 2017

Vitamin D deficiency is significantly associated with risk for multiple sclerosis.
Vitamin D deficiency is significantly associated with risk for multiple sclerosis.

Vitamin D deficiency represents a significant risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), necessitating the need for greater public outreach and interventions to improve vitamin D levels in the population, according to a case-control study published in Neurology.

Source: Neurology Advisor

Read more:  Multiple Sclerosis Significantly Associated With Vitamin D Deficiency

 

 

 

Restless Leg Syndrome Equally Responsive to Multiple Drug Classes

Restless leg syndrome is characterized by the irresistible need to move one’s legs, especially while at rest.
Restless leg syndrome is characterized by the irresistible need to move one’s legs, especially while at rest.

The dopaminergic medication rotigotine and the α-2-δ ligands gabapentin enacarbil and pregabalin provide similar treatment effects for patients with restless leg syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published in the European Journal of Neurology.

Source: Neurology Advisor

Read more:  Multiple Sclerosis Significantly Associated With Vitamin D Deficiency

 

Bryan Bickell retires as a Blackhawk: ‘I want to be a figure for MS and tell my story’

Related Video: Family

Anxiety and Depression Linked to Brain Inflammation in New Study of People with Relapsing-Remitting MS

 

October 2, 2017

SUMMARY

  • In a new study of 405 people with MS, those with inflammatory disease activity observed on MRI brain scans – whether or not they were experiencing symptoms or full-blown relapses – had higher levels of depression and anxiety.
  • When MRI scans showed that disease activity and inflammation had resolved, so did these mood changes. Participants who experienced a relapse within six months had higher levels of anxiety at the start of the study.
  • Further studies are necessary to clarify the association between mood and inflammation – for example, if these symptoms may be predictive of relapses. Right now, though, addressing emotional changes is an essential component of overall health and wellness. Recognizing and addressing issues related to mental and emotional health can greatly improve quality of life for people affected by MS.
  • The team (Drs. Silvia Rossi, Valeria Studer, Jacopo Perugini and colleagues (Isitituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan, and other institutions) report their findings in Neurology (Published online August 25, 2017).

DETAILS
Background: Depression and anxiety are increasingly recognized as common symptoms associated with MS. Research on psychiatric disorders in general indicates that inflammation may play a role in their development, so the current study investigates links between mood and the inflammatory disease activity that occurs in MS.

This Study: The investigators administered psychological tests measuring depression and anxiety to 405 people with relapsing-remitting MS. Inflammatory disease activity was assessed using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) brain scans. In a subset of participants who had not yet received disease-modifying therapies, the team also measured levels of immune messenger proteins in the spinal fluid. Participants were reexamined three and six months later.

Source:  National MS Society

Read more:  Anxiety and Depression Linked to Brain Inflammation in New Study of People with Relapsing-Remitting MS

5 Things to Know About the New MS Drug Ocrevus

The multiple sclerosis community has been waiting with bated breath for the approval of the drug Ocrevus (ocrelizumab), which will be used to treat patients who have relapsing MS and primary progressive MS. The FDA’s decision of final approval arrived on March 28, which coincides with Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Week. In preparation for the announcement, we’ve put together a list of must-know facts about the drug.

Ocrevus will be used for treating primary progressive MS. 

In clinical trials, Ocrevus was found to slow the progress of disability in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), which accounts for approximately 10 percent of MS patients.

Ocrevus will also be used for treating relapsing MS patients. 

Ocrevus was found to slow disease activity in more patients taking the drug compared to those who were taking Rebif.

Source: Multiple Sclerosis News Today
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